Mushurba statue in Gyumri

The goblet with a strange sound 

June 19, 2014 - Travel to Armenia
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Every old nation has some interesting attributes that are not used anymore, but are still famous because they represent a part of the traditions and customs of the country formed by the ancestors of the people living in it.

One of these interesting attributes can be found in the town of Gyumri in Shirak province of Armenia.

It is a goblet called “Mushurba”, the word and the attribute itself probably come from Turkish. Mushurba is a strangely shaped goblet, which is unique because it has its own sound. Yes, when one puts liquid in the goblet it starts to pronounce a special sound. The only producer of Mushurba, Uncle Eduard says, that it is due to the form of the goblet that we hear that sound. The bottom part of the goblet is a little bit larger than the upper one and is spacious. When the water enters that part it starts to form some air bubbles and when the bubbles blow up, they produce that special sound.

Mushurba Gyumri

Not all the Mushurbas produce that sound, and one should know the right technique to make it. Uncle Eduard personally learned the technique from his father, who was a settler in Western Turkey and immigrated to the present Armenia leaving everything behind and taking only his instruments with him.

Eduard actually skips the part that now he is the only person, who knows how to make Mushurba, but he states that, unfortunately, this art will die after him, because the youth doesn’t want to learn it. But he continues to make his mushurbas and is famous in his town as “the only mushurbist”.

Mushurba

His mushurbas are made from different metals: gold, silver, copper, etc. It depends on client request and on the occasion. Gyumri (the city where the only mushurbist lives) even set up a ceremony of gratitude to the citizens who did something good for the city and called the ceremony “The golden Mushurba”. It is something like the “Oscar” in the USA, but not only for the representatives of cinematography.

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